The Social Sciences at Brill

 

The Social Sciences at Brill are central to our mission of publishing superior scholarship that addresses the complex needs and struggles of the ever-changing political and cultural landscape of a globalized world.

Anchored in well-established critical and comparative publications, the Social Sciences at Brill are experiencing dynamic expansion and diversification by reason of our three core principles for achieving enduring growth in ways that are uniquely relevant to the 21st century: 1) social responsiveness; 2) multi-/inter-/transdisciplinarity; and 3) innovation and revitalization.

 

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Podcast: 'In Chains' Episode 3

In the third episode of our new themed series In Chains, we speak with Dr. Alexis Aronowitz from University College Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands, who is the author of the article, “Regulating business involvement in labor exploitation and human trafficking” published in Journal of Labor and Society.

Brill Publishes Two New Book Series in the Social Sciences

Brill is pleased to announce the addition of two new peer-reviewed book series to its Social Sciences publishing program: International Studies in Maritime Sociology and Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work. The series will be published online and in print.

Brill adds Two New Journals to Its Social Sciences Publishing Program

Two journals, the Journal of Labor and Society (JLSO) and Protest, have been added to Brill’s expanding publishing program in the Social Sciences. Both journals will be published online and in print. Previous volumes of JLSO are already available on Brill’s website, the first issues of Protest are planned for publication in 2021.

 

Acquisitions Editor

Brill

Jason Prevost

jason.prevost@brill.com

V&R unipress

Julia Schwanke

julia.schwanke@v-r.de

Author:

The promulgation of a new constitution and the decision of the ICC to prosecute six prominent individuals for crimes against humanity dominated the political landscape. Although a combination of constitutional reform and gradual economic recovery raised hopes that Kenya was entering an era of more accountable and representative government, fresh corruption allegations and the refusal of the government to cooperate with the ICC revealed a lack of political will to end cultures of impunity. As coalition partners fell out over the appropriate response to the constitutional draft and the ICC investigation, speculation over the identity of alliances and candidates that will eventually contest the 2012 elections reached fever pitch. Against this backdrop, a renewed bout of exploration for natural resources, which many believe will lead to the identification of commercially viable amounts of oil, was a source of delight for the political class and deep concern for donors and civil society groups.