The Social Sciences at Brill

 

The Social Sciences at Brill are central to our mission of publishing superior scholarship that addresses the complex needs and struggles of the ever-changing political and cultural landscape of a globalized world.

Anchored in well-established critical and comparative publications, the Social Sciences at Brill are experiencing dynamic expansion and diversification by reason of our three core principles for achieving enduring growth in ways that are uniquely relevant to the 21st century: 1) social responsiveness; 2) multi-/inter-/transdisciplinarity; and 3) innovation and revitalization.

 

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Podcast: 'In Chains' Episode 3

In the third episode of our new themed series In Chains, we speak with Dr. Alexis Aronowitz from University College Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands, who is the author of the article, “Regulating business involvement in labor exploitation and human trafficking” published in Journal of Labor and Society.

Brill Publishes Two New Book Series in the Social Sciences

Brill is pleased to announce the addition of two new peer-reviewed book series to its Social Sciences publishing program: International Studies in Maritime Sociology and Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work. The series will be published online and in print.

Brill adds Two New Journals to Its Social Sciences Publishing Program

Two journals, the Journal of Labor and Society (JLSO) and Protest, have been added to Brill’s expanding publishing program in the Social Sciences. Both journals will be published online and in print. Previous volumes of JLSO are already available on Brill’s website, the first issues of Protest are planned for publication in 2021.

 

Acquisitions Editor

Brill

Jason Prevost

jason.prevost@brill.com

V&R unipress

Julia Schwanke

julia.schwanke@v-r.de

Author:

The Kingdom of Eswatini was a lower middle income country. An estimated 20% of the population controlled 80% of the country’s wealth. The hiv prevalence rate remained one of the highest in the world, with more than a quarter of the adult population infected. King Mswati ruled the country by royal decree. To mark his fiftieth birthday, he changed the name of the Kingdom of Swaziland to Eswatini. The country celebrated 50 years of independence. National elections were accompanied by some instances of violence. The lgbti community held for the first time a street parade to promote their rights. Mismanagement of funds in the health sector left hospitals in a poor state, resulting in the neglect of patients.

Author:

The Kingdom of Eswatini was a lower middle income country. An estimated 20% of the population controlled 80% of the country’s wealth. The hiv prevalence rate remained one of the highest in the world, with more than a quarter of the adult population infected. King Mswati ruled the country by royal decree. To mark his fiftieth birthday, he changed the name of the Kingdom of Swaziland to Eswatini. The country celebrated 50 years of independence. National elections were accompanied by some instances of violence. The lgbti community held for the first time a street parade to promote their rights. Mismanagement of funds in the health sector left hospitals in a poor state, resulting in the neglect of patients.

Author:

The Kingdom of Eswatini faced numerous challenges including poverty, chronic food insecurity, and hiv/aids. With a population of 1.1 m people, 52% of whom are under the age of 20, Eswatini ranks 139th out of 189 in the 2019 Human Development Index. Despite its status as a lower-middle-income country, 63% of the population live below the national poverty line. Rampant corruption, mismanagement of funds, and challenges in the health sector continued to take place in the country.

Author:

The Kingdom of Eswatini is a landlocked country with an approximate population of 1.16 m people. In 2020, the country faced severe challenges that included but were not limited to poverty, chronic food insecurity, financial mismanagement, and severe drought. Eswatini has the highest hiv prevalence in the world and was ranked 139th out of 189 in the 2019 Human Development Index. While ranked a lower middle-income country, 63% of the population live below the national poverty line. The consequences of the coronavirus pandemic exacerbated challenges for the health sector as well as worsening the livelihoods of the majority of the citizens in the country.

Author:

The Kingdom of Eswatini was gripped with political volatility when pro-democracy protests turned violent, with severe clashes between protesters and state authorities. The year also saw a humanitarian crisis as many people faced severe food shortages, further exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. Almost half of the population lived in poverty, on less than $1.90 a day.

Author:

Eswatini’s political unrest, which began in July 2021, intensified as pro-democracy activists called for political transformation in the country. Cases of excessive force by the state, together with arrests of activists, dominated the political landscape. The unrest led to the damage to infrastructure that impacted negatively on the economic sectors of the country. Eswatini remained a lower-middle-income country, in which 69% of the rural population lived below the national poverty line. Eswatini has a very high rate of hiv prevalence, affecting 26% of the population between the ages of 15 and 49. However, statistics released in 2022 indicated significant progress in the reduction of new hiv infections in the last decade.