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Ireland The great theme of British internal politics in the summer of 1914 was the Irish Crisis. Since 1910, the Asquith Liberal government had been supported in the British Parliament by the votes of Irish nationalists who sought home rule for Ireland. The prospect that the Third Home Rule Bill would be passed in 1914 was welcomed by Catholic and nationalist circles in the south of Ireland. The Protestant majority in the north, however, refused to countenance the extension of Irish autonomy to the province of Ulster

PDF Pennell, Catriona - Presenting the War in Ireland, 1914–1918 ISFWWS-Keywords: Ireland Ireland | Politics Politics | Visual Arts Visual Arts

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George V, King of Great Britain and Ireland (June 3, 1865, London – January 20, 1936, Sandringham), king of Great Britain and Ireland (from 1910; from 1921 “of Northern Ireland”; from 1911 also “Emperor of India”). Grandson of Queen Victoria; originally third in succession to the throne. He received military training in the Royal Navy before succeeding his father Edward VII on the throne in 1910. After the outbreak of the First World War, George won great popularity with several visits to the front (on one occasion

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Casement, Sir Roger (September 1, 1864, Kingstown, now Dun Laoghaire, near Dublin – August 3, 1916, London [executed]), Irish nationalist. An Irish Protestant, Casement was a British diplomat, and served as consul in a number of African countries under European colonial rule, as well as in Brazil; he became famous for revealing the brutal behavior of the colonial rulers in the Congo Free State. At the same time, he identified increasingly with radical nationalist politics in Ireland. In July 1914 he went to the

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Carson, Sir Edward Henry (February 9, 1854, Dublin – October 22, 1935; from 1921 Baron Carson of Duncairn), Minster (Kent), Anglo-Irish politician (British First Lord of the Admiralty). As a Protestant, Carson was a lifelong committed advocate of the union of Ireland with Great Britain. He began his career as a barrister, and eventually became a leading English Conservative politician. Carson led the Unionists in the north of Ireland during the Ireland Crisis of 1912, supporting their threat to oppose national

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International Relations during the War | Economy Economy | Home fronts Home fronts | Naval Warfare Naval Warfare | Ireland Ireland | Religion Religion | The Ottoman Empire and the Middle

in cooperation with the Royal Navy. He had already transferred six units of Destroyer Division Eight to Ireland on April 24, 1917, followed shortly afterwards by another two dozen units. In December 1917 five American capital ships arrived in Scapa Flow, where they subsequently formed the 6th Battle Squadron of the British Grand Fleet. In 1919 Benson served as naval advisor to the United States delegation at the Paris Peace Conference, participating in the drafting of the naval passages for the Treaty of Versailles. He retired from the Navy in the

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became Chief of the Imperial General Staff, and was made a field marshal. His resignation following the so-called Curragh Mutiny in March 1914 (when British officers with Irish connections refused to accept the Home Rule Bill) would not prevent him from being appointed Commander in Chief of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) at the outbreak of war. His leadership performance is generally judged to have been poor. He was only too aware that the BEF represented the only land forces Britain had available. This awareness made him careful and occasionally even

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David Lloyd George. In the United States, the Zionist endeavor had been popularized by Louis Brandeis. A Supreme Court justice since 1916, Brandeis even won the approval of President Wilson. Before the Balfour Declaration was published France and Italy added their consent as well. The Balfour Declaration was directed at the Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland and comprised two parts. The first part stated the Jewish claim to Palestine, the second sought to dispel possible objections: the civil and religious rights of existing non

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chancellor of the exchequer under Henry Campbell-Bannerman, whom he succeeded as prime minister in 1908. By no means a dynamic head of government, Asquith was nevertheless a capable and committed politician. During his first year as prime minister, he had to deal with a confrontation with the House of Lords over future constitutional rights to be accorded the upper house in questions concerning the budget, and in relation to the planned Home Rule for Ireland. But initiatives for political and social reform were soon overshadowed by the outbreak of the First World War