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Demography focuses on how a population changes over time, for example, because of birth and death rates and movements (migration, urbanization, emigration, etc.), but also because of political and economic variations, reforms, and values. Consequently, demography is a multidisciplinary field, and demographers may therefore be interested in statistical analyses, mathematics, history, biology, and medicine, as well as in how religions and worldviews (for example, morality, ethics, lifestyle choices) can be correlated with demographic data. Still it is clear that demography and demographical data and explanations are not frequently put to use by scholars of religions. The aim of this entry is to provide an overview to the study of demography and to give examples of how it can be related to religious studies.  ⸙

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This entry deals with the elusive, complex and vague term “power.” Even though a notion of power is often linked to both popular and academic discussions concerning religion and theology — for example, how to interpret texts, god as power, religion and violence, gender norms etc. — power as a theoretical concept has not been greatly developed by scholars of religion. Instead of a clear definition, I suggest, the concept has often been treated in an implicit and vague sense. My entry begins by giving a general overview to how power is understood in the social sciences and humanities, building on the theoretical writings of Steven Lukes’ definitions found in his classic study Power: A Radical View. In the final section of the entry, I provide a suggestion for how power might be studied empirically by scholars of religion.  ⸙